Starlab - Where Science turns into future technologies

Welcome to Starlab

Where science turns into the technologies of the future

Space

galileo.jpg

Starlab Space activities are handled by two synergic Business Units: Space Engineering and Star2Earth.

Starlab Space activities are handled by two synergic Business Units: Space Engineering and Star2Earth.

Products

placa_altera.gif

We transform our R&D capability into innovative technology

Neuroscience

nico_small.gif

Advanced data analysis and custom solutions for brain monitoring and neuromodulation

Services

hand_value_adding.gif

Putting science and research at the service of specific client challenges

Introducing Starlab Ltd.

Starlab Ltd, founded in 2013, is a private company based in the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire (UK). Like its Spanish sister, Starlab Ltd is to provide R&D solutions and services to institutional and private customers, and aims at bridging the gap between research and society through the development of novel solutions. The two companies share the same mission and scope.

Starlab Ltd is currently focusing on the definition of innovative sensors and algorithms for applications in Earth Observation, both from the scientific and operational points of view. We study and develop new space sensors and mission concepts for environmental monitoring: innovative radar concepts, radar altimetry, Synthetic Aperture Radar and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals for Earth Observation are the key areas of expertise.

Starlab Ltd. positions itself as a Value Added Company (VAC) in the provision of operational environmental services. Our downstream market for EO based applications comprises water quality monitoring, determination of snow-coverage, change detection, vegetation monitoring, and soil moisture mapping, together with new operational services and products in the field of wind retrieval and water resources.

We are recruiting! Please follow this link to access the job description of the open vacancies.


Image Credits: ESA